130 Responses to “Dangerous Rottweiller”

    • Mila Ortiz

      Many HOA’s, property management co’s and Insurance have restrictions on Rottweilers, Pit Bulls, Akitas, Chows, German Shepherds and Dobermans. It’s ridiculous.

      Reply
      • Nahima

        You know if those people who make the laws actually talk with breeders and lovers of the breeds we wouldn’t have this BS.

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      • rj

        Well my German Shepherd girl became a poodle mix over the phone while getting quotes on homeowners insurance! If they send an agent out to inspect the property after we close and move in then she will be ‘my moms dog i’m babysitting’ and the poodle passed away! ;p

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    • Megan

      Our homeowners insurance made told us to get rid of our rottweiler or they would drop us. He went to live at my brother-in-law’s house (wink, wink). He’s been in heaven for 5 years now but we won’t get another rott because of the nightmare we had to go through with our insurance.

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      • Kelly

        Just switch homeowner’s policies. State Farm doesn’t have restrictions in most states and neither does Liberty Mutual. I have 2 Am Staffs and a rottie mix, all are covered by my Liberty Mutual policy.

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    • Sheila

      Because those folks are ignorant when it comes to dogs. They have become dependent on false information on Rotties, Dobies, Pits, and other breeds. We have a Rotten Rottie, so we know.

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    • Ruth Tekell

      Insurance companies use actuaries to calculate probabilities, based on statistics, that your dog’s breed might be morel likely to bite someone, causing the homeowner to get sued. I had to change my insurance carrier when I got a doberman — who, by the way would no more bite a visitor than I would. Rottweilers in the top 10 (I think) reported biters. I think they also consider the amount of damage likely to be done.

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      • Kelly Marks

        It is a shame we have to try to hide their breed to make them excepted. Just wanted to let you know, in a lot of places now boxers and certian masiffs are also on the list.

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        • T-dog

          Boxers really? I have never met a boxer that wasn’t a loveable dope. I’ve had boxers and friends with them as well and they have never once been aggressive.Silly laws.

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          • colleen (with a little c)

            i think the reason that boxers are on the list now is because people with pitt mixes frequently say that their dog is a boxer mix. i’m a former boxer owner and a current pitt owner (well doberman-pitt mix…she’s “vicious” when she licks you, rolls over for a belly rub, and excitedly piddles upon meeting) so i love both breeds. I think boxers and pitties have the same wiggley giggley personalities and BSL is bogus.

      • Rebecca

        Our (now late) spaniel/chow mix always became a spaniel mix. We simply didn’t want to deal with all the BS that came with his being labeled as dangerous. Which he most definitely was not!

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    • nobaddays68

      you might want to be careful with lying – it can null and void your homeowner’s insurance for ANY claim

      Reply
  1. Mila Ortiz

    try Foremost – they are a division of Farmers and they aren’t too bad. Also USAA is a good option if you can get it. Good luck and I’m sorry! It’s such a dumb rule.

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    • Rebecca

      We used USAA for our old house (now we live in a coastal area where USAA does not insure), and now we use Atlantic Shield (awesome service!), who did not have breed restrictions. State Farm does not to the best of my knowledge, either.

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      • minniemay

        I’m afraid to say that State Farm does have breed restrictions now. They would not insure us because of our Siberian Husky.

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        • PFB

          State Farm (and most companies) will have to follow local laws. So state farm where I am may not have any restrictions, while state farm where YOU are DOES, even though they’re the same company

          Reply
  2. Paddyspets

    Find out if enrolling your dog in the AKC class, Canine Good Citizen and graduates, if that will lower your insurance price.

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  3. Michelle

    It’s totally ridiculous. When I was little, my dog was half doberman & half rottweiler. He was the most gentle dog & couldn’t hurt a fly. We adopted him from the shelter (whose workers had adopted him b/c no one wanted him & there weren’t a no kill shelter) when he was six. He had previously been a seeing eye dog for someone who was deaf & blind. People need to get over the whole there are bad breeds. There aren’t; it’s the people who make them bad, not the breed itself.

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  4. Alyssa

    Kudos to this woman for actually paying the extra money so she can keep her dog. I know a lot of people who would have given their dog away rather than go the extra mile for them. I have a pitbull myself and thankfully my landlord lets me have him without any hassle (mostly because the last time my landlord came into my apartment, my oh so vicious dog walked up to him, wagging his tail so hard that his back legs were up by his front ones and kissed his hand) but whenever one of my neighbors asks, I say he is a boxer mix. It sucks not being able to tell people what kind of dog he is like I am ashamed of him or something.

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    • AJ

      I would go without some “extras” in life rather than give up my dog. She means the world to me. I know some people who have had to make that choice and skimped on their own “needs” to keep their loving companion by their side. That’s a choice no one should have to make. I’m so glad my dog doesn’t look much like a Pit. If anyone asks, she’s lab and border collie. I conveniently leave out the Pit mix part.

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  5. MAB

    Breed restrictions are completely ridiculous. Bigger dogs just have bigger consequences. Show a dog love, they love back.

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  6. anglea zimmerling

    breed restrictions are rediculous. — blame the deed not the breed. People are the problem not the dogs. That said there are mentally disturbed dogs, cats, horses, fleas…just as their are mentally are people. Banning a breed of animal because of the actions of few is like condemning all humans because of the actions of Ted Bundy, Paul Bernardo, or Charles Manson….

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  7. LoriBelle

    I haven’t read of the entries here, but I read somewhere that State Farm (which I have) will cover any breed at a reasonable price.

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  8. Keiko

    I bet she’s a sweetie. Breed prejudice is just as ignorant as race prejudice, if not more

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    • Megan Wilson

      This is what it boils down to. :) It takes someone with a big heart to keep their baby, pink seahorse and all, to cough up extra money to keep their dog. Kudos to you! And hugs and cuddles to your pooch!!! :)

      Reply
  9. J-M

    Breed restrictions make no sense. I’ve been bitten twice over the years, coincidentally, by two different Cocker Spaniels but I’m not running around calling for Cocker Spaniel restrictions. My son was bitten by a Golden Retriever of all things. I’ve never met a Roti or a Pitty who’ve been anything but sweet. Just another way for insurance companies to make money.

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  10. E Bonzar

    Have you shopped around? We adopted a pit bull last month, and had to change home owner insurance companies because of it. My old company, Progressive won’t cover pitties. My new company, Farmers, not only covers them, they were also 120 bucks cheaper per year for the same coverage!! State Farm also doesn’t have breed restrictions.You don’t have to carry a rider if you find the right company!

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  11. MsKat

    Any breed, if mistreated or raised in a negative environment, can be dangerous. These larger breeds get picked on more simply because their teeth are bigger. I recall, while working at a bank, the evening courier would bring his Pit, a female brindle named Tigger, whom he rescued from an abusive household, along for the ride. Woo, yeah she was just so mean…she would come in and run to the counter so I could pet her and give her lovins, then go find a spot on the floor to stretch out and wait til we closed. If it was quiet I would come out and rub her belly and talk to her…she absolutely loved it. Customers would come and go, she would not move from that floor til he had the bag and it was time to go. Yeah, she was dangerous, alright…breed discrimination sucks…

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  12. stars15k

    The top three biters are Dachshunds, Jack Russell’s, and Chihuahuas. I have a mini-Doxie and a Jack Russell/Chihuahua mix (we call her a Jack-Chi-terrier….say it fast and out loud.) Just in case, we have a “Beware of Dogs” sign on our fence. We have never been approached about insurance, though. Breed-specific rules and laws are just stupid and ignorant.

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  13. Pandora

    We pay a small mint in home owners insurance because of my pit bull and because of, strangely enough, my Huskies (of which I have 2 – one full breed one half, mixed with lab) apparently now a lot of insurances list any of the “Wolf breeds” as dangerous as well. the insurance also requires me to have a notice on both my gates and my door claiming I have dangerous dogs. but my most dangerous dog? my chi-wiener who barks and snarls, sounding and acting 1000 times more vicious than my big guys. It’s stupid!

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    • Rebecca

      I know what you mean by “wolf breeds,” but it is so silly that the phrase even exists. All breeds of domesticated dogs’ DNA is traced back to the wolf. Even little chihuahuas and yorkies!

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  14. paleokitty

    We are guardians for one of these sweet babies. He was abandoned at 7days old and is now 7 months old. I absolutely adore him! He is the sweetest, smartest, most well-behaved dog I have ever known. He has never messed in the house, never chewed anything, loves everyone. We take him to the dog park several times a week to play and he has never show an ounce of aggression. In fact, other dogs pick on him because he is such a woosie! These breed specific laws are insane, it is the owner, not the dog. Like children, the become what they are taught to be. Raise them in love and they are loving. Raise them in an environment of violence and fear and they strike out. Have you noticed, not too many Rottweilers get submitted to dog-shaming. That says something!

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  15. Karen Lawrence

    Please change insurance company! I used to do inspections, literally “meet and greets” for people’s dogs, and trained company reps to do the same. We did this for several insurance companies. Look for a premium insurer, such as Safeco, Vanguard, Hartford. Call around – plenty of companies don’t rate for dogs, some rate for all dogs, and some literally check to see!!!! I am not rated for my dog at all. Liberty Mutual. Good luck!!!!

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  16. Alli

    THANKS! I’m Winnie’s mom… she is the sweetest lady every, wouldn’t hurt a fly. My insurance company said they were going to do a random house inspection of the exterior… well, I didn’t know how I would explain the cute rottie in my yard and house. So I jumped through hoops and only got one because I have a great credit score. Don’t know how other people do it.

    p.s. she’s a rescue.

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  17. Kristen

    From my paper route experience as a kid, the only breeds I’m very leery of are doxies, cockers, and schnauzers. Those were always the dogs that would try there hardest to eat me alive! All of the big “mean” dogs on my route were huge babies. I always looked forward to seeing them and they looked forward to getting treats from me! There was the massive German Shepherd named Samson who would run around from the back of his house, throw the log he was eating on the ground, and chase me down the street. He was just teaching me faster peddling techniques!!

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  18. Deborah J Schmidt

    It stinks that a dog is tagged “dangerous” just by the breed. I had a pit bull many years ago and she was a big old softie. Her name was Babe and if you were a garden hose, she woulda torn you apart. But other that garden hoses, she was a very sweet tempered dog.

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  19. Susan

    We had a beautiful Rottweiler (aka shepard-lab mix, for insurance purposes). She was definately a lover not a fighter. We didn’t even have the option of paying extra. Yours is adorable! She looks like a snuggler.

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  20. Piperwest12

    Your Rottweiler, who is gorgeous, is a restricted breed, but My Shih Tzu isn’t, because he is small. Yet my Shih Tzu has caused injury to people and needs to be muzzled at the vets! He has gone through 3 trainers, he has calmed down now because of his age, people need to stop judging breeds by the size of their teeth. My cousins Pit Bulls are calm, sweet dogs.

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  21. Laura

    A former roommate had a Doberman who was the silliest, most affectionate dog you’ve ever met.

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  22. C

    You are awesome for the sacrifices you make for your vicious dog! :). Thanks to irresponsible parents makes life by difficult for those who are responsible.

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  23. Tiffany

    Erie insurance was definitely willing to cover us with my pit mix after meeting her! So thankful for them b/c everywhere else was either not going to cover us or it was going to cost a fortune!

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  24. Chalase

    Our Rotties were listed as “Short-Tailed German Cattle Dogs” which is not a lie. you can also make a resume for them, listing their obedience class and/or titles. insurance companies love that.

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  25. Nahima

    You should watch the Beyond the Myth (its on netflix). I know its about Pit Bulls but they talk about breed restriction. Its sad that so many sweet loves have to be taken away from homes or people unable to pay for such insurances. Its madness and the only ones thats should be punished are the people who treat the animals horribly.

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  26. Ann Y.

    BSL is BS! I have a Pit/Boxer mix and I always call her a Boxer mix, which is what I told my insurance company. I also have a Carolina Dog, but guess there are no problems with his breed. Before he passed away, I had a Pit/Lab and always called him a Lab mix. In the past I’ve had German Shepard, Doberman and Rottie mixes. All these dogs have been the best and sweetest dogs and the worst thing they would do would be to lick you to death.

    The worst dog bites I have ever gotten were from a friends’ Yorkie. That dog was nasty. I’ve also had a Chihauha try to attack me, but nobody would think of these little dogs as being a danger.

    I wouldn’t give up my Pittie mix girl for anyone or anything and I would never hesitate to bring a full blooded Pittie into my home. Good for you for doing what you have to do to keep your beautiful girl with you!

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  27. Carol G

    I’ve seen a mistreated pair of Rotts so mean they would fight for no reason BUT I also dog sat a friends 120 lb Rott in my home for about six months due to restiction while they relocated with my young children. He was the sweetest, most gentle giant I’ve ever meet. After the first week I had ABSOLUTLY NO CONERNS about this wonderful animal with my family and he was sleeping on the foot of my bed!!

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  28. PrAdA

    Oh please! these vicious dogs vicious activities only includes 1 thing, lick you till you feel you went for a swim.
    Its all about the trainers and owners and how they keep their dogs!

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  29. Tami

    My insurance co rep grilled me about the breed of my rescue puppy. The only part of her we’re sure of is that she’s a Golden Retriever mix. They wanted to know what other breeds she might be. She’s a rescue; how would I know? I invited her to visit and meet her personally. She declined. My girl is my personal protector and has never shown aggression towards any person.

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  30. ateal0809

    I feel your pain I have 3 “vicious” pitbulls that might hurt you by whacking you with their crazy wagging tail or licking you to death!

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  31. jill ince

    any dog can be a jerk…regardless of the breed. for themost part they learn it from jerk people.

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  32. Michele Turner

    When I was getting my homeowners insurance, I had a border collie-lab mix, and brought her to the appt with me. They did go over the list of breeds they restricted, and I asked her upon what type of evidence was it based, because golden retrievers were the top biters at the time, but they weren’t on the list. She was not able to give me an answer at the time, and I forgot to pursue it. I now have a lab-carolina dog mix, but people see pit in her too. I don’t know exactly what she is, but am training and socializing her, even training her to wear a basket muzzle, since she’s still not always 100% fine around other dogs.

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  33. Teresa

    State Farm: it is up to the individual agent. I had another company and they said they couldn’t cover me anymore because of my Rottweiler. So I called State Farm and got coverage the next day at a better price.

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  34. Lori

    We had a Rotty that was 175lbs in her prime years. She was the most docile loving dog we have ever lived with. It just irks me that some group gets it in their heads that certain breeds are “dangerous”. Love your baby and her pink baby seahorse .

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  35. Debbie Schulz-Peterson

    If you have the owners contact info, tell her to call ANPAC. American National Property and Casualty, they have no breed restrictions. (I don’t have the number but they can get info from the website.) I verified this with them when I got my German Shep from a rescue. They don’t care what type of dog you own, prob one of the only insurance co in the US that literally don’t care what type of dog you have.

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  36. Crystal

    Bless her heart. I’m more afraid of the ankle bitting Westie my grandmother has then mass of love resting on your sofa!!!!

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  37. lizardjamz

    Our dog was a rescue from the animal shelter and they had him down as a lab mix and his vet agreed. He is obviously a pit mix. But the good news is we have it on paper that he is a lab mix so if we ever run into problems we can pull it out and say, nope, not what the vet says.

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  38. Tara

    Ha, my pit bulls are “Lab/terrier mixes”! LOL Oh, the things we do to protect our babies from the people who thing they need protection from them!

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  39. Stan

    My neighbor has the sweetest, smartest pitty mix ever – Ginger is even a certified therapy dog and volunteers one day a week at the local children’s hospital. The second time some anonymous person called the city accusing Ginger of being a pitbull, he didn’t just call the city to defend his dog – he also called the local paper and a slow news day. A few weeks later, an awesome front page article was published – complete with an adorable photo of Ginger visiting a 6 yr old girl, bald from chemotherapy and in isolation, at the hospital, quotes from her parents and oncologist about how the dog lifts her spirits, and all the training the dog was required to complete before being allowed to set paw in the hospital.

    For all subsequent anonymous complaints, he just sends the city a copy of the article, as well as the hospital’s chief oncologist’s phone number (should there be a need for an authority to explain that Ginger is so gentle and well-behaved).

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  40. Dixie Amazon

    The only time a family member has been bitten by a dog it was none of the so called dangerous breeds. It was a border collie chasing my son’s bike.

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  41. Hilary

    I have a Kelpie (looks like a rott/shepard mix) that has never bitten anyone but is on a breed restriction list. My daughter, however, has been bitten in the face by a Dachshund.

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  42. Ed and Diana Bal

    Had two Rottie’s. They really got a bad Rap…Our’s are so calm and loving, all the time. Even around our small Great grandkids… Actually they protect them when they are in the yard playing…No regrets here.

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  43. Helena

    What’s the insurance for? Just the house? A kitten can do a terrible amount of damage, why have breed restrictions? I’m from the UK, and not a homeowner…I don’t understand!

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    • Helena

      Also I was bitten really badly by a Border Terrier, but Rotties always try to lick me to death!

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  44. Angie Daniels

    I live in a building with no breed restrictions (have a large mixed breed dog) or size restrictions. Guess what lives here? LOL. All the pitbull owners in town. I think we did a pet interview but as long as the dogs are spayed/neutered, no big deal.

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    • Ingrid

      I know, I had a pup, Taz, a shihtzu / chow mix who had a temper He has biten me a few times. Always had to watch where he was, who was with him and if they were pushing his buttons. If there was a small growl, back away….. he is at the Rainbow Bridge now, he was a funny little boy, as long as you knew when to leave him alone… 20 pounds…

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  45. MICHELE

    I feel your pain, I have the same issue, lots of good tips here, I wish you and ur baby luck, As these tips have definetly helped me and baby boy!!!!

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  46. Debra

    Personally had two rotties and one doberman over the last 33 years – raised with all the children in our families… Best dogs ever!!!!!! And soooo smart. Love the breed. Our current rottie is such a baby and hides in the tub when scared…..and my brother’s rottie puts himself to bed with his blankie. Our chihuahuas, on the other hand, are obnoxious and have never obeyed us like the big guys. But, we love them too in spite of their short comings! LOL

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  47. Marc

    My insurance says I can’t have a second Doberman. I guess I’ll get a second Giant Dachshund.

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  48. Irene

    Your insurance company is right. You and your neighbors clearly need to be protected from those dangerous pink seahorses.

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  49. Beans

    I would love to adopt a pit bull but as I am a long term apartment dweller I cannot. BSL is a sign of total breed and historical ignorance.

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  50. Lunara

    Aw, BSL is so stupid. What a sweet baby. My uncle had two rotties and I remember playing Mario with my cousin, using my uncle’s ‘vicious’ and ‘untrustworthy’ rotties as pillows.

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  51. Heather Clark

    My poodle grouch is much more dangerous than my son’s. pit bull! He’s always been a grouch, and gets worse the older he gets.

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  52. stephen

    my neighbor has some kind of pit/rott mix. It’s the sweetest knot of muscle you’ll ever meet.

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  53. Jacque

    She looks just like our younger Rottie, Lucy. She is best friends with Benny, our bigger Rottie. Lucy is only 2/3 Benny’s size . My husband tells everyone we have a Rottweiler and a Runtweiller!!

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  54. Christine Parks

    Awwwwww such a sweet baby. So silly that insurance companies do this!! Is this by state ? Or is it all insurance companies? I have a mutt so I didn’t know this. Not fair.

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  55. B Keller

    Our Rottweiler would be a good host and help make the robber feel at home by showing them where the silver & other valuables were. Our Golden Retriever, on the other hand, was out to get anything that came on our property until she knew that WE knew they were there. Then she was a good host. I miss both those dogs because they were so opposite of what was considered “normal” for the breed.

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  56. chuck miller

    My renters ins is great. They just ask if we have dogs- dont even ask the breed, just if they ever bit anyone. I have two rotties and I even volunteered the info. She didnt care. And I have great rates! Now I do rent and I pay my landlord the homeowner ins also. He also didnt care about the breed. I am not sure if his ins co knows or not.

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  57. Donna DeWeese

    A burglar is going to pass by a house where a big dog lives. Criminals go for easy targets (I know b/c I have worked in a prison for over 7 years). You should be charged LESS, just as though you had a high-tech alarm system. I want to see the actuarial evidence of increased claims involving these so-called dangerous breeds. At the state level, we need a Secretary of State to take on the insurance companies and BE A HERO! Love to roll around the floor playing and having kisses from a friend’s Pittie.

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    • Kathleen J Wells

      Yup, when my husband first started driving truck, he was told by TWO different cops to get me a big dog. Even though they are softies, they give a bigger impression.

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  58. Donna DeWeese

    And another thing, at least one local government in Georgia has passed a law requiring owners of pits to have coverage for $100,000 of liability, makes me STEAMING mad. The shelters are loaded with pit mixes in Georgia and Florida. On a positive note, my friend J.D. worked hard for 2 years and finally got her condo association to accept dogs.

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  59. Mrs.Smith

    What a pretty lady! We love our Rottie to absolute pieces, she is the sweetest dog I’ve ever met. She loves children, all humans and generally ignores other dogs. Our Boston Terrior, on the other hand, cannot be trusted around children because he snaps. Goes to show that “breed standards” are BS!

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  60. Michele

    We have a Staffie (who is a huge baby, loves everyone, scared of everything). USAA doesn’t charge us extra for her. They base their decision about higher premiums for some breeds based on the number of dog bite claims they’ve had to pay. That at least is fair, I think. (And we do effectively have BSL here in Maryland…hopefully to be overturned soon).

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  61. Gina

    I know, I am on my third big baby, my other rottweillers past, my dogs (a rott and a jack russel mix, look out the front window when people jog or walk by and its the little mix that growls and barks, my rott just wags her little stub and smiles!

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  62. Tara

    We have 2 adorable Rottis. One might be a danger of licking someone to death. The other might bruise with his crazy long and strong tail. He is the crappiest guard dog ever! He barks at strangers and then runs away LOL! We have them because we love the breed not as guard dogs though, so it doesn’t matter.

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  63. Mindy

    We had to search around for a renters policy because of our late pit bull/ German shepherd mix dog. It was so dumb because the pup was a big ole baby and love ppl and other dogs. I hate breed restrictions they are made by ignorant people because of a few bad dogs (actually its my belief that in those incidents it’s also the owners fault as well)

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  64. Deborah Catlett

    Our rottie was the best most friendliest of all our dogs (he passed away from cancer 2 yrs. ago),our yorkie is down-right mean. No insurance cocomplains about her, even though she would probably spent the whole time they were around, trying to bite them..

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  65. Cyndi Giles

    Just reviewed our home owners insurance today. Farmers has no restrictions. Just wants to know what you have and that they don’t bite. No surcharges for any breeds. I rescue and foster. This was not a problem. Farmers! Stay away for American Family, they have a long list of breeds, some don’t even make sense.

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  66. Amber Williams-Larson

    I rent, and I have Allstate for my renter’s insurance. I told them up front when I changed insurance companies from Progressive (who wouldn’t give me renter’s insurance), that I have a Great Dane. The only question that I was asked about her was “Really, what color is she?”

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  67. springacres

    Boo on breed restrictions! I’ve met 4 dobies, a staffie mix, 3 rotties and several pits or pit mixes… all of whom would much prefer LOVING people to death to hurting them in any way!

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  68. Monique Slegers

    In my country you can take out health insurance for you dog, vet costs our unbelievably high! However, home insurance never covers damages done by your dog. Love your dog though, reminds me of my first dog, gorgeous Rotti named Daisy. Still miss her every day. Now I have a very naughty Welsh springer x English cocker spaniel. She’s goofy and makes my day.

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  69. Shannon in the desert

    We have Foremost and they never asked us about our dog’s breed. I am not sure they even asked if we had dogs. But we have a shepherd mix so we were a little worried we’d have a problem when we bought our house.

    FYI insurance policies have nothing to do with Breed Specific Legislation. It’s all in the money. If they lose money insuring certain breeds, they exclude them or charge more. It could be a Lab or Pit or Golden, doesn’t matter. If their stats show they have paid out on dogbite claims for a particular breed, they have the right to charge more. They are in the business of making a profit, not paying you ;) And it is absolutely correct that if you lie about your dog, you may nullify your homeowners policy. That is not a risk worth taking. I love my dogs but they are not worth losing my house over…just find a policy that doesn’t make you lie, and if you have to pay more for it, do. It’s just like buying life insurance and lying about your health…there’s no point paying for insurance if you aren’t going to get the benefits when you really need them.

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  70. LMD

    I’m with Shannon. Our neighbors have a Newfoundland currently, and used to have a “boxer mix” (read: pit bull). Unfortunately, their young sons would and still do let the dog out occasionally from their fence gate, and my pug/chi/rat mix is the first thing to visit. Before their pit passed away, I was over their house with my dog, and she almost became lunch. That’s when my neighbors learned their pit pooch didn’t like sharing her toys. And I’ll never forget this: a friend of mine had a couple of pit mixes for years and they were great with her–until she got into a heated argument with her significant other–and one went straight for her throat. It was a total shock for everyone. Your dog may be a real sweetie pie, but things can change pretty quickly depending on the situation. The strength and prey drive of certain dogs is what some people value and have historically bred them for. Sweet disposition or not, you can’t ignore the fact that the potential for danger is there.

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  71. Kayla

    We have People’s Trust Insurance (Florida) and $300k in liability for our two dogs, a rottie mix and a shepard mix. A bit extra onto the policy, but totally worth it. You guys have to understand that having a large dog IS a liability, as sweet as they may be with you, they could potentially hurt someone else (your insurance company doesn’t hang around your dog to get to know his personality) and they will definitely get sued in this overly litigious world. Medical bills for dog bites or even ‘accidents’ (large dog knocking someone over when greeting them.) Not to mention people that have access to your property legally while your gone (electric man, water man, mail man…) Also, I see some people here mentioning ‘BEWARE OF DOG’ signs.. Please check you local legislation!! The law in Florida is that the sign has to read ‘BAD DOG’ -exact verbage- to warn strangers and excuse the homeowner of liability if a person proceeds on the property without permission. We have one on each gate to the backyard and one at the front of the house just to be certain!!!

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